Pacific Cancer Programs

Breast Cancer: Information for Program Managers and Coalition Members

What Do We Know About Diet and Breast Cancer?

The Panel of WCRF/AICRconcludes in Chapter 7.10, pages 289-295

The evidence that lactation protects against breast cancer at all ages thereafter is convincing. Physical activity probably protects against postmenopausal breast cancer, and there is limited evidence suggesting that it protects against premenopausal breast cancer. The evidence that alcoholic drinks are a cause of breast cancer at all ages is convincing. The evidence that the factors that lead to greater attained adult height or its consequences are a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer is convincing; these are probably a cause of premenopausal breast cancer.

The factors that lead to greater birth weight or its consequences are probably a cause of breast cancer diagnosed premenopause. Adult weight gain is probably a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer. The evidence that body fatness is a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer is convincing, and abdominal body fatness is probably a cause of this cancer. On the other hand, body fatness probably protects against breast cancer diagnosed premenopause. There is limited evidence suggesting that total dietary fat is a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer.

Source: Second Expert Report: Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective. World Cancer Research Fund / American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR), Washington DC: AICR, 2007. 537 Pages. Note: PDF file of the complete report is 12 MB in size. More about this report can be found on the "diet" link [or some other name later] of this website.

  • Download the entire report: (pdf 12 MB).
  • Download a 16-page summary of the report: (pdf 1.2 MB).
  • To download the report's summary in other languages than English (WCRF website), please click here.

MedlinePlus - Breast Cancer Link - MedlinePlus will direct you to information to help answer health questions. MedlinePlus brings together authoritative information from NLM, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and other government agencies and health-related organizations. MedlinePlus also has extensive information about drugs, an illustrated medical encyclopedia, interactive patient tutorials, and latest health news. Please make sure you check the MedlinePlus online for breast cancer with an extensive, constantly updated resource list.

Resources for Managers and Coalition Members

Guidelines

Guidelines for the Management of Breast Cancer

WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean. EMRO Technical Publications Series 31, 2006, 56 pages.

Although the etiology of breast cancer is unknown, numerous risk factors may influence the development of this disease including genetic, hormonal, environmental, socio biological and physiological factors. Over the past few decades, while the risk of developing breast cancer has increased in both industrialized and developing countries by 1%-2% annually, the death rate from breast cancer has fallen slightly. Researchers believe that lifestyle changes and advances in technology, especially in detection and therapeutic measures, are in part responsible for this decrease.

Breast cancer does not strike an individual alone but the whole family unit. Despite considerable social changes, women continue to be the focus of family life. The impact of breast cancer is therefore profound on both the woman diagnosed with the disease and her family. Their fear and anxiety over the eventual outcome of the illness may manifest itself through behavioural changes.

Global Action Against Cancer

WHO/UICC, Geneva, updated 2005, 24 pages.

This booklet presents key facts and figures on the global cancer burden and quotes leading experts on the current cancer control challenges. It covers cancer mortality and incidence for 12 regions around the world and tracks the evolution of the global cancer picture in years to come, if current trends continue.

Barriers to Early Detection of Breast Cancer Among Women in a Caribbean Population

Rev Panam Salud Publica/Pan Am J Public Health 5(3), 1999, Naomi N. Modeste, Vonna Lou Caleb-Drayton, and Suzanne Montgomery.

The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify and describe barriers to early detection of breast cancer, as well as current breast cancer screening behaviors and attitudes regarding the disease, among women aged 20 and older on the Caribbean island of Tobago.

Editorial: Breast Cancer in Developing Countries: Challenges for Multidisciplinary Care

Breast Care 2008;3:4-5, Raimund Jakesz. 2 pages.

Guidelines for International Breast Health and Cancer Control Implementation

The Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) strives to develop, implement and study evidence-based, economically feasible, and culturally appropriate "Guidelines for International Breast Health and Cancer Control" for low- and middle-income countries to improve breast health outcomes.

Supplement: Introduction (p 2215-2216) - Benjamin O. Anderson, Sandra R. Distelhorst.

A Time for Creative Collaboration

Gabriel N. Hortobágyi, MD, Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. Cancer, Volume 113 Issue S8, Pages 2217 – 2220. 4 pages.

Defining a Global Research Agenda for Breast Cancer

Richard R. Love. 6 pages (p. 2366-2371)

Guideline Implementation for Breast Healthcare in Low-income and Middle-income Countries: Overview of the Breast Health Global Initiative Global Summit

Benjamin O. Anderson, Cheng-Har Yip, Robert A. et al. (2007) (p 2221-2243)

Guideline dissemination and implementation research plays a crucial role in improving care, and adaptation of technology is needed in low- and middle-income countries (LMCs), especially for breast imaging, pathology, radiation therapy, and systemic treatment. Curricula for education and training in LMCs should be developed, applied, and studied in LMC-based learning laboratories to aid information transfer of evidence-based Breast Health Global Initiative guidelines.

Guideline Implementation for Breast Healthcare in Low- and Middle-income Countries: Early Detection Resource Allocation

Cheng-Har Yip, Robert A. Smith, Benjamin O. Anderson, et al, on behalf of the Breast Health Global Initiative Early Detection Panel. 13 pages (p 2244-2256).

Guideline Implementation for Breast Healthcare in Low- and Middle-income Countries: Diagnosis Resource Allocation

Roman Shyyan, Stephen F. Sener, Benjamin O. Anderson, et al, on behalf of the Breast Health Global Initiative Diagnosis Panel - 12 pages (p 2257-2268).

Guideline Implementation for Breast Healthcare in Low- and Middle-income Countries: Treatment Resource Allocation

Alexandru Eniu, Robert W. Carlson, Nagi S. El Saghir, Jose Bines, et al. - 13 pages (p 2269-2281).

Guideline Implementation for Breast Healthcare in Low- and Middle-income Countries: Breast Healthcare Program Resource Allocation

Joe Harford, Edward Azavedo, Mary Fischietto - 15 pages (p 2282-2296).

Breast Pathology Guideline Implementation in Low- and Middle-income Countries

Shahla Masood, László Vass, Julio A. Ibarra Jr wt al. 8 pages (p 2297-2304).

Breast Radiation Therapy Guideline Implementation in Low- and Middle-income Countries

Nuran Senel Bese, Anusheel Munshi, Ashwini Budrukkar, Ahmed Elzawawy, Carlos A. Perez, on behalf of the Breast Health Global Initiative Radiation Therapy Focus Group. 10 pages (p 2305-2314).

Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Treatment Guideline Implementation with Particular Attention to Low- and Middle-income Countries

Nagi S. El Saghir, Alexandru Eniu, Robert W. Carlson, Zeba Aziz, Daniel Vorobiof, Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, on behalf of the Breast Health Global Initiative Systemic Therapy Focus Group. 13 pages (p 2315-2324).

Breast Cancer Prevention in Countries with Diverse Resources

Anne McTiernan, Peggy Porter, John D. Potter - 6 pages (p 2325-2330).

Strategic Health Communication Across the Continuum of Breast Cancer Care in Limited-resource Countries

Gary L. Kreps, Rama Sivaram. 13 pages (p 2331-2337).

Re-establishing a Surgical Pathology Service in Kumasi, Ghana : Case Report and Discussion of Barriers and Key Elements of a Successful Collaboration Between Low- and High-resource Countries

Helge Stalsberg, Baffour Awuah, Julio A. Ibarra, Anthony Nsiah-Asare. 9 pages (p 2338-2346).

Revision Surgery for Breast Cancer : Single-institution Experience

Mangesh A. Thorat, Ashvin Rangole, Mandar S. Nadkarni, Vani Parmar, Rajendra A. Badwe - 6 pages (p 2347-2352).

Effective but Cost-prohibitive Drugs in Breast Cancer Treatment : A Clinician's Perspective

Jose Bines, Alexandru Eniu. 6 pages (p 2353-2358).

Breast Cancer in Latin America: Results of the Latin American and Caribbean Society of Medical Oncology/Breast Cancer Research Foundation Expert Survey

Eduardo Cazap, Antonio Carlos Buzaid, Carlos Garbino, et al. 7 pages (p 2359-2365).

Bridging the Gap - Annual Report 2006

International Union Against Cancer (UICC), Geneva 2007; 40 pages.

The human cost of cancer is high. Every death from the disease means a family bereaved, a workforce diminished, a community deprived. The economic burden is also heavy. We need to count not just the soaring cost of cancer treatment, but also the cost of productivity lost through illness and death. Strategic investment in cancer prevention and control offers significant economic benefits - and nowhere more than in the developing world.

Cancer Control Planning - Resources for Non-Governmental Organizations

International Union Against Cancer (UICC), Geneva, 2006; 48 pages.

Cancer control is a public health approach aimed at reducing the burden of cancer in a population. Planning integrated, evidence-based and cost-effective interventions across the cancer continuum (research, prevention, early detection, treatment, and palliative care) is the most effective way to tackle the cancer problem and reduce the suffering of patients and their families.

Most countries have yet to begin a systematic national cancer planning effort. Where governments are concentrating on other immediate health priorities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) can play a critically important role in increasing public and leadership awareness of the cancer problem and in developing effective partnerships to take on the responsibility of cancer planning.

NCCN Treatment Guidelines for Patients: Breast Cancer

ACS and National Comprehensive Cancer network (NCCN) 2007, 96 pages.

Breast Screening

Breast Screening: The Facts

National Health Service of the United Kingdom's Breast Cancer Screening Programme. 2006, 12 pages.

Designed to ensure that women are told what screening can and cannot achieve, the leaflet includes an explanation about false positive and false negative results, and addresses the need to inform patients about the use made of personal information for audit, as set out in the General Medical Council guidance on confidentiality.

  • Download the PDF file in English: (pdf 291 KB).
  • To visit the NHS website to download PDF files in 20 different languages, please click here.
  • To visit the National Health Service (NHS) Breast Screening Programme for the U.K., please click here.

More About Breast Screening and BreastScreen Aotearoa

National Screening Unit, Ministry of Health of New Zealand, 2007, 62 pages.

The Community Guide - A CDC Resource for Cancer Screening

Evidence-based recommendations for programs and policies to promote population health. The Community Guide has conducted systematic reviews of interventions designed to improve early detection and control of cancer by increasing screenings for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer.

  • To visit The Community Guide website on Cancer Prevention & Control, please click here.

American Cancer Society Guidelines for Breast Cancer Screening: Update 2003

Robert A. Smith, Debbie Saslow, Kimberly Andrews Sawyer, et al. CA Cancer J Clin 2003 53: 141-169. 30 pages.

Cancer Screening in the United States, 2008: A Review of Current American Cancer Society Guidelines and Cancer Screening Issues

Robert A. Smith, Vilma Cokkinides, and Otis Webb Brawley. CA Cancer J Clin 2008 58: 161-179. 20 pages.

Breast Self-Examination (BSE)

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in many countries, including developing countries, with an estimated 999,000 new cases and 375,000 deaths in the year 2000. Breast cancer incidence and mortality rates are increasing in most countries of Africa and Asia. Early detection linked to appropriate treatment is currently the most effective strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality. Mammography screening is expensive, involve substantial financial and manpower resources and thus not feasible in developing countries. The efficacy of organized early detection programmes based on breast self-examination (BSE) and/or clinical breast examination (CBE) remains inconclusive and controversial. It seems that much could be achieved by increasing the awareness of the population on breast cancer symptoms and signs, the good prognosis associated with treatment of early stage disease and by providing readily accessible and effective diagnostic and treatment services.

Source: Text from IARC website.

Breast Self-Examination (BSE) is a routine examination that should be carried out at the same time each month to physically check for any lumps or other changes. It entails two important components, i.e. looking and feeling. With this method, women should learn what is normal for them, so that they can recognise any changes immediately.

This online resource provided by the The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) shows and computer generated bear-breasted woman demonstrating a breast self examination.

Frequently Asked Questions: Breast Awareness and Breast Self-Exam

Why should I do a breast self-exam? Women should know how their breasts normally look and feel. Doing regular breast self-exams is the best way to know this. They also help you to notice any changes in your breasts. This is also true for women who have breast implants. A change can be a sign of a problem. If you find a change, see your doctor right away.

Susan G. Komen for the Cure is the most prominent breast cancer foundation in the USA. They offer a great interactive tool for breast self-awareness. Follow the link below to their website and scroll down the page until you reach the section entitled: “Breast Self-Awareness (BSA) Interactive Tool”. To use the interactive tool, you must have Adobe Flash Player installed. The tool is offered in four languages (English, Spanish, Hindi, and Chinese). If you click on one of these links, a new window will open and you can watch step-by-step, medically explicit videos with women demonstrating a breast self-exam using a mirror.

Quality Assurance (QA) and Improvement

Pacific Island Health Officers Association (PIHOA)

PIHOA is dedicated to the health and well-being of the Pacific Island populations. The links and documents on their website have been selected from a very large body of available materials about quality assurance (QA) and accreditation in health care, with the intention of including those that are especially useful for PIHOA members and their associates who are interested in building QA systems which fit with their local needs. The materials have been grouped into several sections.

Flyers and Brochures

Understanding Breast Health

This publication form the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is a basic two-page fact sheet. It describes the parts of the breast and answers common questions about breast cancer.

Understanding Mammograms

This two-page fact sheet explains what a mammogram is and when you should get one.

Mammograms and Breast Health

This 20-page brochure provides detailed information about breast health, breast cancer, and mammograms, and includes a list of resources for further information.

What You Need To Know About Breast Cancer

NCI, 2006, 81 pages.

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in this country (other than skin cancer). Each year, more than 211,000 American women learn they have this disease. You will read about possible causes, screening, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care. You will also find ideas about how to cope with the disease.

Just the Facts... Breast Cancer

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 2006, 2 Pages.

Reducing Your Risk of Breast Cancer

World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF UK), 2008. 2 pages.

The most up-to-date advice on simple ways you can help reduce your risk of the most common female cancer.

Shower Cards for Breast Self-Exam

‘Imi Hale the Native Hawaiian Cancer Network’s has translated a series of shower cards for breast self-exam into a variety of Pacific languages. Please click on the language to download the PDF file:

It Is Important to Do a Breast Self-Examination

English/Chamorro. 2 pages.

Created by Guam Communications Network.

Samoan Breast Self-Exam (BSE)

Samoa Nurses Association, 2 pages.

Presented in the Samoan language, the Samoan BSE is a tool that may help you learn what is normal for you.

Breast Awareness Shower Card

World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF UK), 2007. 12 pages.

A handy guide to breast awareness and the steps you can take to reduce your risk.

Breast Cancer Information Sheet

Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research and Training (AANCART) 2003. 2 pages.

Beliefs and Attitudes of Samoan Women Toward Early Detection of Breast Cancer and Mammography Utilization

Ishida, Dianne N and Toomata-Mayer, Tusitala F and Braginsky, Nafunua S, 2001. Cancer 91:262-266. 5 pages.

U.S. Government and General Resources

2006/2007 National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program Fact Sheet

CDC, 2007. 4 pages.

1991–2002 National Report: National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP)

CDC, 2002. 88 pages.

Summarizing the First 12 Years of Partnerships and Progress Against Breast and Cervical Cancer.

National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) Policies and Procedures Manuals

Because the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) is grounded in Public Law 106-354, CDC has developed two guidance resources to help programs meet NBCCEDP requirements. One such resource is the NBCCEDP Policies and Procedures Manual. No date, 33 pages.

CDC has also created an NBCCEDP Program Component Chapter Overviews that provides an overview of each NBCCEDP program component, i.e., Program Management, Data Management, Evaluation, Recruitment, Screening and Diagnostic Services, Partnerships, Professional Development, and Quality Assurance and Improvement. No date, 16 pages.

Community Health Worker Programs Materials

A Handbook for Enhancing Community Health Worker Programs: Guidance from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (Part 1), and Breast and Cervical Cancer Messages for Community Health Worker Programs: A Training Packet (Part 2), from 1998 can be found on the CDC website.

  • To visit CDC's Community Health Worker Programs Materials webpage, please click here.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) provide many on-line cancer resources. The great advantage of these organizations is that the information gets constantly updated, reflecting the latest scientific findings. On-line texts have an interactive dictionary where you can click on terms that sound unfamiliar and get an explanation in plain English. For people without on-line access these materials can also be ordered in the mail or by phone.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is a leader in nationwide cancer prevention and control, working with national organizations, state health agencies and other key groups to develop, implement, and promote effective cancer prevention and control practices.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), one of eight agencies that compose the Public Health Service (PHS) in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

The National Cancer Institute coordinates the National Cancer Program, which conducts and supports research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to the cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer, rehabilitation from cancer, and the continuing care of cancer patients and the families of cancer patients.

NCI publishes a wealth of information about cancer on the Web. To make it easier for you we have provided direct breast cancer links from NCI below:

  • Breast Cancer PDQ for Health Professionals.
    (PDQ, as it is commonly known stands for Physicians Data Query. The "health professional" link is more scientific and focuses on treatment options).
  • Breast Cancer PDQ for Patients.
  • To read the publication “What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer” on-line, please click here.
  • NCI’s booklet “What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer” helps you to learn about cancer symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and questions to ask your health care provider. NCI 2006, 71 pages. Download the PDF file: (pdf 582 KB).

American Cancer Society (ACS) is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service.

  • To view the ACS Breast Cancer Information webpage, please click here.
  • To view a complete list of ACS Guidelines for Cancer Prevention and Early Detection, please click here.

Susan G. Komen for the Cure, often referred to as the "Komen Foundation" provides extensive information, videos, and podcasts about breast cancer.

Online Tools and Pacific Focus Resources

Asian and Pacific Islander Cancer Education Material (APICEM)

Provided by AANCART, the APICEM Tool provides links to Contributor’s web sites containing Asian or Pacific Islander cancer education materials. The materials referenced here have been screened by the contributing organizations/programs for medical accuracy and cultural relevance. The contributors remain solely responsible for the content of their materials. Please note that all materials remain copyrighted and property of the contributors providing them. They are made availableOn this page you find links and resources that can be useful in planning activities that are not exclusively focusing on cancer. Organizations that have a Pacific focus, or provide materials and tools for Pacific Islanders are featured as well. Please visit the respective organization for the up-to-date information.

Siteman Cancer Center: Cervical Cancer - Your Disease Risk

This interactive tool estimates your risk of cancer and provides personalized tips for prevention. Anyone can use it, but it's most accurate for people age 40 and over who have never had any type of cancer.

  • To take the Siteman Cancer Center Cervical Cancer Questionnaire, please click here.

Visuals Online from the National Cancer Institute

NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the Office of Communications and Education and Office of Media Relations, National Cancer Institute. Contents include general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

Use of Images. Except where noted on the image details page, Visuals Online images are in the public domain and may be used, linked, or reproduced without permission. If you use an image, you should credit the listed source and/or author.

The Curricula Organizer for Reproductive Health Education (CORE)

Note: you need internet access to use this resource. You can browse the CORE library and download PowerPoint slides for presentations that have been peer reviewed. The fastest way is to put "HPV" or "cervical cancer" in their search engine and see if it is of any use to you.

CORE is managed by the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals (ARHP) and is a collaborative effort of many organizations working to improve the quality and quantity of reproductive health information included in health professions education. The Curricula Organizer for Reproductive Health Education (CORE) is a collection of peer-reviewed, evidence-based teaching materials.

Use CORE to:
* Access up-to-date teaching materials on reproductive health topics
* Build your own curricula and other educational presentations
* Download activities, case studies, and other handouts for learners

The Pacific Island Health Officers Association (PIHOA)

PIHOA is dedicated to the health and well-being of the Pacific Island populations. PIHOA serves as a unifying voice and credible authority on issues of regional public health significance. Execution of this charge is attained through collaborative and cooperative efforts in capacity building, advocacy and policy development, to provide medical care, promote healthy lifestyles, prevent disease and injury, and protect the environment.

'Imi Hale -Native Hawaiian Cancer Network

A Community's Response to Cancer Prevention and Control. ‘Imi Hale is the "hale" (house) from which cancer research, education and awareness will be nurtured and developed through a concerted effort with community partners, and guided with the confidence that indigenous Hawaiians can reverse the negative effects of cancer and leave a powerful legacy and inheritance for future generations based on good health and well-being.

Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research and Training (AANCART)

The Asian American Network for Cancer Awareness, Research and Training (AANCART) is a cooperative agreement between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the University of California, Davis. It is the first-ever national cancer awareness research and training infrastructure intended to address Asian American concerns.

Asian and Pacific Islander Cancer Education Material

Provided by AANCART, the APICEM Tool provides links to Contributor’s web sites containing Asian or Pacific Islander cancer education materials. The materials referenced here have been screened by the contributing organizations/programs for medical accuracy and cultural relevance. The contributors remain solely responsible for the content of their materials. Please note that all materials remain copyrighted and property of the contributors providing them. They are made available on their website to print as a convenience.

Weaving an Islander Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (WINCART)

Weaving an Islander Network for Cancer Awareness, Research, and Training (WINCART) is a unique, collaborative, community participatory effort to reduce cancer health disparities among Pacific Islanders in Southern California. The WINCART network involves eight community-based agencies (Ainahau O Kaleponi Hawaiian Civic Association, Guam Communications Network, Orange County Asian Pacific Islander Community Alliance, Pacific Islander Health Partnership, Samoan National Nurses Association, Sons and Daughters of Guam Club, Tongan Community Service Center/Special Service for Groups, Inc., Union of Pan Asian Communities) along with researchers from five universities (California State University-Fullerton, University of Southern California, University of California-Irvine, University of California-Los Angeles, and University of California-Riverside). Together, we are working to promote community education, research and training for five of Southern California's Pacific Islander populations: Chamorros, Marshaleese, Native Hawaiians, Samoans, and Tongans.

Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum

The mission of APIAHF is to enable Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to attain the highest possible level of health and well-being. It envisions a multicultural society where Asian American and Pacific Islander communities are included and represented in health, political, social and economic areas, and where there is social justice for all.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

AHRQ Mission: To improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of health care for all Americans.

Kokua Mau - Hawai‘i Hospice and Palliative Care Organization

Kōkua Mau is the state’s hospice and palliative care organization, and it is comprised of individual and organizational champions and supporters from hospitals, education, consumers, insurance, long term care and hospices. Our statewide non-profit organization strives to improve quality of life for people in Hawai‘i by promoting excellence in hospice, end-of-life care, palliative care and early advance care planning.

Research Tools

The INFO Project

The INFO Project, based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs, envisions a world of interconnected communities where shared reproductive health information improves and saves lives. Our mission is to support health care decision-making in developing countries by providing global leadership in reproductive health knowledge management. Through collaborative approaches and the innovative use of sustainable technology, we:

  • Inform those who influence and improve health care and public health,
  • Enhance the capacity of communities and organizations to obtain, adapt, and generate knowledge and best practices, and
  • Connect communities, organizations, and individuals locally and globally to facilitate knowledge sharing and dialogue. The project receives support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
  • RTIPs and Research Reviews

    The Guide to Community Preventive Services evaluates the effectiveness of broad intervention categories through systematic research reviews. This site provides a consumer-reports-like list of programs that have been reviewed by a panel of topic experts in the field. Programs are rated on 16 criteria, for which six are reported, including dissemination capability; cultural appropriateness; age appropriateness; gender appropriateness; research integrity and intervention impact.

    RITP is a satellite site of Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. a Web portal as a collaborative effort aimed at providing access to data and resources that can help cancer control planners, health educators, program staff, and researchers design, implement, and evaluate evidence-based cancer control programs.

    • To learn about the sponsors of Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T, please click here.
    • To see RTIP’s research tested intervention programs for cervical cancer screening programs, please click here.
    Pacific Language Materials

    Shower Cards for Breast Self-Exam

    ‘Imi Hale the Native Hawaiian Cancer Network’s has translated a series of shower cards for breast self-exam into a variety of Pacific languages. Please click on the language to download the PDF file:

    It Is Important to Do a Breast Self-Examination

    English/Chamorro. 2 pages.

    Created by Guam Communications Network.

    Samoan Breast Self-Exam (BSE)

    Samoa Nurses Association, 2 pages.

    Presented in the Samoan language, the Samoan BSE is a tool that may help you learn what is normal for you.

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    Funding for this website was made possible by a cooperative agreement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, through the following:
    Pacific CEED, award #: 5U58DP000976,USAPI Community Health Interventions Project (CHIP), award #: 1U58DP005810,
    Pacific Regional Central Cancer Registry, award #: 5U58DP003906; Regional Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, award #: U55/CCU923887.
    The views expressed on this site do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services;
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